Sep 18, 2021  
Catalog 2020-2021 
    
Catalog 2020-2021 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Japanese

  
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    JAPN 197 - Independent Study


    Allows lower-division students to independently study a particular aspect of Japanese culture and language. A written proposal for the study/research must be approved in advance by the sponsoring faculty member and the program chair. Number of credits depends on the nature of the student’s academic goals and the consent of the faculty advisor.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 201 - Intermediate Japanese I


    This is a continuation of JAPN 102 . Students will continue to develop proficiency at an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will use the language to investigate, explain, and reflect on the relationships between the practices, products and perspectives of Japanese culture and compare them with their own.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 102  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    General Education: C2 Humanities:Lit, Philosophy, Lang other than Eng
    University Requirement: WCL World Cultures&Languag-BS, WCLP World Cult & Lang Prof-BA
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 212 - Samurai Spirit


    This course explores the four periods of the samurai tradition to survey changing roles and philosophy behind its existence. The survey will analyze contemporary images/stereotypes of the samurai. The course employs ancient war tales, historical documents and paintings, maps, articles, literary works, different genres of samurai films, and videos to fully examine one of the most popular Japanese cultural icons. Taught in English. 

    General Education: C2 Humanities:Lit, Philosophy, Lang other than Eng
    Typically Offered: Spring term only

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 213 - Manga, Anime & Modern Japan


    This course uses Japanese manga (comics) and anime (animated films) as mirrors that reflect the Japanese experience of rapid economic and social transformation over the past 150 years. Starting with the examination of ancient Japanese style of visual expression, we will trace how manga and anime sketch out a parallel world that is linked both historically and culturally to the imagined community of the Japanese nation-state. Taught in English.

    General Education: C1 Arts: Arts, Cinema, Dance, Music, Theater
    Typically Offered: Spring term only

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 215 - Cool Japan Today


    This course examines contemporary media culture and products as a conceptual lens to focus on Japanese pop culture and soft power in the 21st Century. Manga, Anime, Cinema, literature, performance art, music, and fine arts will all be surveyed with an eye to understanding what exactly is cool and different about Japanese creative work and whether these kinds of cultural exports could become the foundation of a new post-industrial Japanese economy. Taught in English.

    General Education: C1 Arts: Arts, Cinema, Dance, Music, Theater
    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 285 - Intermediate Interpersonal and Interpretive Communication III


    This course focuses on interpersonal and interpretive communication in daily situations at intermediate level and is a companion course for JAPN 201  and JAPN 300 .

    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 1-2
  
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    JAPN 286 - Intermediate Interpersonal and Interpretive Communication IV


    This course focuses on interpersonal and interpretive communication in daily situations at intermediate level and is a companion course for JAPN 201  and JAPN 300 .

    Typically Offered: Spring term only

    Units: 1-2
  
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    JAPN 295 - Special Topics


    Studies a particular topic in Japanese. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

    University Requirement: WCL World Cultures&Languag-BS
    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 296 - Field Studies


    Individualizes student placement for field study as related to Japanese.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 297 - Independent Study


    Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 300 - Introduction to Advanced Communication


    This is a bridge course from intermediate to advanced Japanese language. Students expand their cultural knowledge and language by investigating and comparing a broader range of topics in Japanese. Taught in Japanese. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 201  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 301 - Advanced Japanese Culture, Language and Communication


    This course continues to develop advanced level Japanese competency through further acquisition of Japanese cultural knowledge on a variety of fields and disciplines in content-based instruction. Taught in Japanese. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 201  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    University Requirement: ES Ethnic Studies
    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 302 - History of Japan


    This course further develops advanced level Japanese through building and expanding knowledge of Japanese history as a dynamic, interrelated system and employs a variety of processes to identify, analyze and evaluate cultural themes, values and ideas. Students will demonstrate ability to accurately comprehend ideas across a range of historical content. Taught in Japanese.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 201  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    Typically Offered: Fall term only - odd years

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 303 - Business Japanese


    This course develops functional use of Japanese language for various types of situations and events that occur in the daily business environment. The types of situations include formal introductions, basic business rules, business etiquette, honorifics, and how to write business documents and email. It also presents and expands on cultural perspectives and concepts as they impact the business world. Taught in Japanese.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 201  or equivalent with C- or better)
    Typically Offered: Fall term only - even years

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 304 - Introduction to Translation & Interpretation


    This course is an introduction to translating and interpreting that provides an overview of the knowledge necessary for the fields of translation and interpretation. Students will study general issues involved in translating and interpreting and building the foundation of knowledge and techniques including rapid reading, analyzing, summarizing and paraphrasing, listening comprehension and shadowing. Taught in Japanese.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 300  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 305 - Introduction to Japanese Culture & Civilization


    This course introduces various aspects of Japanese culture, including history, geography, religion, government, politics, customs and traditions. After a broad historical overview beginning in prehistory, this course focuses on the Tokugawa period as the bedrock for understanding modern Japanese society as a mass society. Taught in English.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)
    General Education: UDC Intergrated Arts and Humanities
    Typically Offered: Fall term only - even years

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 306 - The Japanese Mind


    This project-based course looks behind the Japanese social mask to understand Japanese people’s thoughts, behaviors, aesthetics and ideology. It covers modes of thinking, making friends and influencing others, decision making, ethical systems and hierarchical relationships. Taught in English.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)
    General Education: UDC Intergrated Arts and Humanities
    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 307 - Japan-American Experience


    This course focuses on Japanese-American experience from the 1860s to the present as an ongoing study in ethnographic assimilation, including early immigration and response; immigration and labor laws; property rights; and WWII internment. Students identify and evaluate the issues of the ethics of assimilation, racial and ethnic discrimination, educational opportunity, social justice, and cultural identity. Taught in English.

    University Requirement: ES Ethnic Studies
    Typically Offered: Spring term only - odd years

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 308 - Japanese Pop-Culture


    This course explores post WWII Japanese music, literature, artistic media, and hi-tech products. Investigates social themes ranging from post-holocaust Japanese hedonism to childhood fantasies by looking at Manga comic books, Animation, and popular music, as well as fashion and style, popular technology, consumerism, and environmental issues. Explores the evolution of pop culture and its impact on society. Taught in English.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)
    General Education: UDC Intergrated Arts and Humanities
    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 309 - Masterpieces in Japanese Literature


    This course explores early Japanese prose and poetry to detect native motifs that continue into modern literature. Dramatic scripts, I-Novels, surrealistic fiction, and contemporary authors including Yoshimoto Banana and Murakami Haruki will be read and written about in a student-created literary online diary. Taught in English.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)
    General Education: UDC Intergrated Arts and Humanities
    Typically Offered: Spring term only - even years

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 310 - Japanese Cinema


    This course provides an introductory scrutiny of major Japanese directors and genres with attention to film composition, choices of subject and character, and the relationship of cinema to Japanese culture and society. Students will analyze and discuss cinematographic elements and cultural codes among a variety of film genres, production of their historical and socio-cultural context, as well as issues dealing with popular culture and equity. Taught in English.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)
    General Education: UDC Intergrated Arts and Humanities
    Typically Offered: Fall term only - odd years

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 311 - Social Issues In Japan


    As the drive to rebuild modern Japan after WWII slowed, latent and new social problems have become visible. This course offers interdisciplinary perspectives on issues such as care of the elderly and homeless, equal treatment of minorities, gender and labor issues, domestic and world ecological concerns, and relevant institutions that promote or attack prejudice towards heterogeneous social groups. Taught in English.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)
    General Education: UDD Integrated Social Sciences
    University Requirement: GWAR Graduation Writing Assess
    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 312 - Japanese for the Professions


    This course is designed to develop a functional use of Japanese and cultural perspectives and concepts for professional occupations such as education, business, technology, and hospitality. Students will learn how to interact and collaborate in a variety of situations that focus on business etiquette and effective communication as members of the business community. Taught in Japanese.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 300  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    Typically Offered: Spring term only - odd years

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 314 - Japanese Visual Culture and Media


    An analysis of historical and modern Japanese society through works of art and media including photography, film, maps, and other visual materials. Students learn to extract information from images as part of a visual analysis, while dealing with socio-geographical methods for understanding urban flows, economic disparities, transportation, and built environments. Students compare what they understand about Japanese culture with their own familiar environments. Taught in English. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)
    General Education: UDC Intergrated Arts and Humanities
    Typically Offered: Spring term only - odd years

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 315 - Japanese Business Culture


    This course examines a variety of business practices and norms in present-day Japan while introducing the historical development of Japanese corporate systems. Students will analyze the socio-cultural concepts that underlie Japanese business structure and new development and trends in Japanese business. It offers an understanding of how to communicate efficiently, build credibility, and form viable business relationships. Taught in English.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 316 - Japanese Myth and Folktales


    This course examines the native belief systems and the supernatural as reflected in a rich tradition of folktales, myths, songs, and proverbs in Japan. Students analyze the ways in which social practice and cultural norms/codes have been linked to folklore in Japan. The course also employs a variety of media such as woodblock prints, animation, and films to study the various manifestations of the supernatural in Japanese culture. Taught in English.

    Typically Offered: Fall term only - odd years

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 317 - Pacific Food Empires


    This course examines the historical processes that have informed the food on our plates. In particular, we will look at food as a medium through which to understand the processes of migration, invention, colonialism, imperialism, and capitalism that have shaped much of the Asia-Pacific world, including Japan and the United States. Students will have a clear understanding of the processes of colonialism and globalization that informed the spread and invention of different food cultures and cuisines.

    University Requirement: ES Ethnic Studies
    Typically Offered: Spring term only

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 320S - Japanese for the Global Community


    Students will have the opportunity to engage with community projects of import and relevance, while examining issues of justice, compassion, diversity and social responsibility. Students will have the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of Japanese language and culture through their community service to promote global citizens and develop communication skills through discussions, reflection essays and presentations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 300  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    University Requirement: UDSL Upper Division Service Learning
    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 340 - Language for Professions: Japanese


    This course is designed to develop a functional use of Japanese for the professions. Students will learn how to respond to a variety of situations that focus on professional matters such as customer service, telephone conversations, and effective communication as a member of the professional community. It also presents and expands on cultural practices with perspectives and concepts. Taught in Japanese.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): [Prereq: (GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better) and (JAPN 102  or equivalent) with C- or better]
    General Education: UDC Intergrated Arts and Humanities
    University Requirement: WCL World Cultures&Languag-BS, WCLP World Cult & Lang Prof-BA
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 350 - World Culture and Language: Japanese


    This course focuses on language use related to the cultures of the Japanese speaking community. It addresses culture-specific practices and concepts that cannot be translated into English. Students will also learn the use of Japanese to communicate at basic levels in culturally appropriate ways. Taught in English and Japanese. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)
    General Education: UDC Intergrated Arts and Humanities
    University Requirement: WCL World Cultures&Languag-BS
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 380 - Japan: Land and People


    This course introduces the language and culture of Japan through a thematic approach. Selected topics include geography, climate, population, and industry. This course is designed to develop advanced Japanese language competency and to introduce various aspects of related Japanese culture using technology and web-based materials. Taught in Japanese.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 300  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    Typically Offered: Spring term only

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 395 - Special Topics


    Studies a particular topic relative to the Japanese language or cultures. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-12
  
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    JAPN 396 - Field Studies


    Individualizes student placement for field study as related to Japanese.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 397 - Independent Study


    Individual study of a particular aspect of Japanese language, culture, or civilization. A written proposal for the study/research must be approved in advance by the sponsoring faculty member and the program coordinator. Number of credits depends on the nature of the student’s academic goals and the consent of the faculty advisor.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 401 - Structure of Japanese Language


    This course aims to develop basic understanding of structural features of Japanese language. Students will be introduced to basic phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, and discourse levels of Japanese. Taught in Japanese.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 300  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    Typically Offered: Spring term only - even years

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 402 - Japanese Literature


    This course aims to develop an advanced level of communication by interpreting and analyzing various aspects of modern Japanese literature, including short stories and significant works by authors of the modern period. Taught in Japanese.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 300  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    Typically Offered: Spring term only - odd years

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 403 - Pre-Capstone


    This course aims to develop an advanced level of academic communication through the formulation of research questions on linguistic and cultural topics, using appropriate research methods and critical thinking skills. Students utilize a variety of information sources to investigate, organize, and analyze the information. Taught in Japanese.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: JAPN 300  or equivalent with a C- or better)
    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 2
  
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    JAPN 404 - Advanced Japanese for Presentational Communication


    This course aims to develop an advanced level of academic communication to finalize research projects using appropriate research methods. Students analyze and synthesize their research findings to orally present and to write academic papers using APA style. This course is a companion course for WLC 400  (Major Capstone). Taught in Japanese.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): [(Prereq: JAPN 300  or equivalent with a C- or better) and (Coreq: WLC 400 )]
    Typically Offered: Spring term only

    Units: 2
  
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    JAPN 405 - Cultural Landscape of Japan


    This course examines a variety of Japanese socio-cultural contexts while introducing the significant aspects of diverse geographic regions, as well as ways of landscape use. Through the exploration of Japanese landscapes, students learn to analyze the unique senses of space, the concepts of nature and culture, the roles of tourism, and the growing tensions between urban and rural centers in Japan. Taught in English.  

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 4
  
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    JAPN 407 - Japan in the Globalized Community


    This course examines the history of pre-war Japan in the world, and how this legacy impacts interactions with its Asian neighbors. How is modern Japan optimizing its position in Asia and how do others in the region perceive these efforts? How do Japanese cultural exports change perceptions of Japan and the Japanese people? How is Japan opening up to people from other countries, and how does this impact its position as a world leader? Taught in English. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)
    General Education: UDD Integrated Social Sciences
    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 410 - Quakes and Nukes: (Un)Natural Japanese Environments


    Japan is richly diverse, from the tundra-like north to the subtropical south. Its islands are shaped by earthquakes, volcanoes, and man-made ecologies. We study the Japanese archipelago from multiple scientific and humanistic perspectives, including material from scientific journals, films, history, anthropology, and Japanese comics. We cover the basics of Japanese geology, Pacific seismology (the Ring of Fire), the causes and effects of nuclear radiation, and the changes to the land. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: GE  Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with C- or better)
    General Education: UDB Integrated Scientific Inquiry and Quant Reason
    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 3
  
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    JAPN 420 - Maximizing Study Abroad Experiences


    Your study abroad experience is potentially a rich opportunity for you to enhance your language skills and deepen your understanding of other cultures, people and their practices. This course provides the resources to help you prepare to maximize your study abroad experiences. This course is taught in English.

    Typically Offered: Spring term only

    Units: 1-2
  
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    JAPN 495 - Special Topics


    Studies a particular topic relative to the Japanese language or cultures. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 496 - Field Studies


    Individualizes student placement for field study as related to Japanese.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 497 - Independent Study


    Individual study of a particular aspect of Japanese language, culture, or civilization. A written proposal for the study/research must be approved in advance by the sponsoring faculty member. Number of credits depends on the nature of the student’s academic goals and the consent of the faculty advisor.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 595 - Special Topics


    Studies a particular topic relative to the Japanese language or cultures. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 596 - Field Studies


    Individualizes student placement for field study as related to Japanese.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6
  
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    JAPN 597 - Independent Study


    Individual study of a particular aspect of Japanese language, culture, or civilization. A written proposal for the study/research must be approved in advance by the sponsoring faculty member. Number of credits depends on the nature of the student’s academic goals and the consent of the faculty advisor.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-6

Kinesiology

  
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    KIN 102 - Monterey Bay Adventure Sports


    This course will focus on the many outdoor recreational opportunities surrounding CSUMB and the Monterey Peninsula. Students will have an opportunity to participate in hiking, trail running, mountain biking, kayaking, surfing and canyoneering, with an emphasis on safety and training. Requires off-campus trips, equipment rental fees and a final exam.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Units: 2
  
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    KIN 109 - Swimming: Beginning


    Teaches the very basic techniques, skills, and concepts of swimming to those with little or limited swimming experience. Develop a sense of confidence in swimming through 12 steps to practice and the common combination of drills. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 110 - Strength Training


    Students learn about and engage in resistance training as a means of improving and maintaining muscular fitness. Includes basic instruction in exercise technique, spotting, safety and basic resistance training program design.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 111 - Swimming for Fitness


    Students engage in swimming and learn about the use of swimming as a means of improving aerobic fitness. Also targets improvements in stroke efficiency. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 113 - Wake-Up Workouts


    Students learn about, develop, and execute a personal fitness program; emphasizing improvements in muscular and aerobic fitness through a wide variety of activities. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 114 - Walking


    Students learn about and engage in fitness walking as a means of improving health and well-being. A variety of walking venues are used along with special small or large group activities. Credit/ no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 116 - Adaptive Sports: Aquatics


    Instructs on adapting Physical Activity for each individual’s unique needs through the use of the pool to enhance one’s overall health and well-being. Course content decided upon between instructor and student. Designed especially for individuals with permanent or temporary disability. Credit/no credit. (Offered as needed)

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 117 - Adapted Sports: Dry Land


    A learning experience for individuals who would like to select a physical activity program with adaptations to meet their individual needs. Course content decided upon between instructor and student, resulting in many program options and variety. This experience, in conjunction with adapted aquatics can provide daily activity for individuals who are temporarily or permanently in need of adapted physical activity. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 118 - Water Aerobics


    Using flotation devices, students follow the instructor through a wide variety of movements using the water as resistance with the goal of improving muscular and aerobic fitness. No experience in swimming necessary. Credit/ no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 119 - Aquatics Activities


    Provides instruction in water activity that ranges from underwater hockey to water polo. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 120 - CPR/First Aid


    Covers instruction and practice in the immediate and temporary care of injuries and sudden illness. Includes emergency response, rescue breathing, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and first aid for adults only. Conforms to American Red Cross standards. Optional written and practical certification exam offered at end of course.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 123 - Step Aerobics


    An introduction to step aerobic exercise. Additional cardiovascular training methods such as dance may also be included. The course also will teach students to monitor their progress throughout the semester. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 125 - High Intensity Interval Training


    Students engage in high intensity interval training (HIIT) focusing on cardio and body weight strength movements.  

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 131 - Beginning Tai Chi Chi Kung


    Short Sun Style form of qigong exercises to improve mobility and flexibility and develop better balance. The second form emphasizes power, a simple Yang style Tai Chi/Chi Kung form that teaches the principles of body mechanics through the alignment of the bone structure with the force of gravity. Explains theory and provides training for effective practice of any form of Tai Chi. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 132 - Beginning Chen Taijiquan


    Consists of step-by-step progression to a Chen 26 Movement Form. Fundamentals include standing meditation, proper body posture, footwork drills, along with self-defense applications. Training in body mechanics, including whole-body exercises which increase mobility, promote relaxation, and reduce physical tension and strain. Credit/No Credit.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 134 - Self-Defense


    A hands-on class that incorporates the four components of self-defense: awareness, avoidance, and verbal and physical techniques. Teaches verbal and physical self-defense skills from a standing position and from the ground. This class focuses on rape-prevention and aims to reduce fear and empower students with skills to defend themselves against physical, verbal and sexual attacks. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 139 - Yoga


    Introduces the physical practice of yoga and explores the emotional and philosophical aspects of this ancient discipline. Practice of postures build from basic poses to more challenging poses. Builds strength, endurance and flexibility through practice. Also includes the study of yoga through assigned readings, class discussions and journaling. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 140 - Yoga II


    Designed for students who have completed KIN 139  and wish to continue their study of Yoga. Welcomes beginners with no prior yoga experience as well. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 141 - Disc Golf


    Students learn the skills, beginner through advanced, needed to master the game of disc golf. Credit/No Credit

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 143 - Volleyball


    Introduces students to indoor court volleyball. Students develop passing, blocking, and hitting skills. Students learn the rules, scoring, and team strategies and tactics. Credit/No Credit

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 144 - Basketball


    Facilitates the development of fundamental skill in basketball. While skill enhancement is the desired outcome, also covers the rules and regulations of the game, and the history and growth of basketball. Credit/ no credit.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 145 - Softball


    Students develop throwing, catching, fielding, hitting, and base-running skills while learning rules, scoring, and team strategies for offensive and defensive fast-pitch and slow-pitch softball. Credit/ No Credit

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 148 - Running


    Students learn and practice the training methods and techniques needed to develop cardiovascular fitness. Students develop a personal running training program. Credit/No Credit

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 149 - Surfing


    Covers surfing for beginners and first timers. Opportunities for advanced surfers to act as aids to the head instructor. Covers etiquette, right of way rules, equipment, and safety. Must be able to pass a swimming safety test. Includes extensive in-the-water experience. Requires some equipment. Surf boards will be supplied. Course fee required. Credit/ no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 151 - Sailing I


    Apply theory to practice in small centerboard type sailboats. Includes maneuvering and driving a boat, rules of the road, nomenclature, knots, developing teamwork, and practicing water and boat safety. Includes extensive on-the-water experience. Must have the ability to swim. Requires course fee. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 152 - Sailing II


    Apply theory to practice in keelboats. Covers rules of the road, sailing language, knots, and water safety. Sailing skills include reefing, heaving-to, crew-overboard recovery, and changing sail while underway. Covers skills such as anchoring, docking, and tide and weather consideration. An American Sailing Association (ASA) certification course, includes lecture and extensive on-the-water experience. Must have the ability to swim. Requires course fee. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1
  
  •  

    KIN 161 - Health and Well Being


    This course will cover health and well being topics focusing on the health effects of stress, stress management skills, applied nutrition and core concepts in exercise and weight management. In addition to these core topics, the course will address the six dimensions of wellness: physical, emotional, intellectual, social, environmental and spiritual.

    General Education: E Lifelong Learning and Self-Development
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer, Winter

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 162 - Fdn of Wellness: Nutrition


    Addresses core concepts of health and wellness, the interrelationship and benefits of physical fitness, proper nutrition, and effective stress management in theory and practice. Emphasizes nutritional understanding and actual eating decisions. Includes self-assessments, development and implementation of personal wellness goals/plans/actions, and self-reflection on consequences of lifestyle choices.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 180 - Backpacking & Hiking


    Provides students with the knowledge and skills to safely backpack and hike in a variety of conditions. Focuses on equipment, menu planning, navigation and leave-no-trace camping.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Coreq: KIN 180L )
    Typically Offered: Spring term only

    Units: 1
  
  •  

    KIN 180L - Backpacking & Hiking Lab


    Required lab course for KIN 180 . Includes a three-day backpacking trip over a weekend and several day hikes on Fort Ord recreation lands. Requires course fee. Credit/ no credit.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Coreq: KIN 180 )
    Typically Offered: Spring term only

    Units: 1
  
  •  

    KIN 195 - Special Topics


    Studies a particular topic in Kinesiology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 1-4
  
  •  

    KIN 238 - Introduction to Qigong


    The study of Channeling Energy and Self-Empowerment. Teaches eastern theory and practice for cultivating energy or “Chi”. Course addresses Qigong meditation practices. Credit/No Credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
  •  

    KIN 254 - Kayaking


    Introduces skills for intermediate level sea kayaking. Covers equipment, paddling techniques, navigation, weather, surf zone dynamics and rescues. Earn a certificate from the American Canoe Association upon completion. Credit/No Credit

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Coreq: KIN 254L )
    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 1
  
  •  

    KIN 254L - Kayaking Lab


    Required lab course for KIN 254 . Requires field trips and course fee. Credit/no credit.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Coreq: KIN 254 )
    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 1
  
  •  

    KIN 263 - Introduction to Human Sexuality


    Addresses the core concepts of human sexuality and the interrelationship that exists between it and mental, physical, social, emotional and spiritual well-being. Assists students in understanding the nature of their own sexuality, the importance of sexuality in their lives and the responsibility and pleasure it brings to individuals and their partners. Emphasis will be placed on the variations of expressions by culture, age, and orientation and their relationship with well-being.

    General Education: E Lifelong Learning and Self-Development
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 271S - Fdn of Well: Comm Participate


    Provides an overview of factors that contribute to health and wellness while engaging in self-reflective, culturally aware and responsive community participation with community organizations.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 5
  
  •  

    KIN 281 - Rock Climbing


    Focuses on top-roped rock climbing and bouldering. Covers equipment, techniques, and training. Includes knots, anchor systems, belaying, rappelling, and risk assessment. Held outdoors and requires one weekend trip. Requires course fee. Credit/no credit.

    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 1
  
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    KIN 300 - Major Pro-Seminar


    Introduces the history, debates, and definitions regarding the interdisciplinary degree in Kinesiology. Explores research skills needed to complete Senior Capstone project. Develops a learning plan that integrates a KIN concentration, Capstone interests, and personal and professional goals..

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 1
  
  •  

    KIN 301 - Research Methodologies


    This course is an introduction to the design and interpretation of research. The course will familiarize students with testing, evaluation, and measurement techniques required of all Kinesiology disciplines. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the foundations and practice of quantitative and qualitative approaches.

    Typically Offered: Periodically offered

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 303 - Fundamental Athletic Injury Management


    An introductory course covering the basic concepts of administering management for common athletic injuries as they pertain to athletic participation at all levels. The class will cover topics such as necessary medical terminology, pertinent anatomy, bloodborne pathogens, emergency response plans, basic injury prevention, mechanisms, recognition and treatment, including some elementary taping techniques. Emphasis will be made on the role of the Certified Athletic Trainer.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 305 - Technique in Strength & Conditioning


    Students learn appropriate technique in strength and conditioning as it relates to basic performance, assessment, and program development. Focus includes content necessary for nationally recognized certification exams administered by organizations such as the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 310 - Athletic Strength & Condition


    Presents practical application of physiological and biomechanical theory for development of and implementation of sports conditioning prescriptions. Helps athletes achieve optimal physical performance without incurring injury. Includes content necessary for nationally recognized certification exams administered by organizations such as the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 320 - Sports Nutrition


    The course will use a current evidence based approach to relevant topics in Sports Nutrition. The student will become proficient in the anatomy and physiology of digestion, absorption and current nutritional guidelines. Additionally, the student will utilize current recommendations to evaluate and determine the appropriate nutritional strategies for a comprehensive array of recreational and competitive sports with the goal of improving performance and health.

    Typically Offered: Winter term only

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 330 - Physical Activity and Health


    Provides students an integrated view of the relationship between physical activity or sedentarism and health outcomes; also, it provides a conceptual framework to help the students relate results from single studies or collections of studies to the overall paradigm linking physical activity and physical fitness to health. The class will focus on the prevention of diseases and the enhancement of quality of life and well-being.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 331 - Lifespan Physical Activity


    This course is a study of physical activity throughout the lifespan. Topics include current research, theory, and practice pertaining to physical activity in varying age groups, from childhood through older adulthood.

    Typically Offered: Spring term only

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 335 - Fundamentals of Coaching


    Explores coaching from a literary and a personal perspective. Builds appreciation for the depth of the coaching profession through literature, studying different authors’ views on topics that every coach in every sport must face. After establishing a solid base with literature, explores the topic in a hands-on environment through group discussions and projects. Provides an opportunity to explore the culture of coaching, highlighting several key points.

    Typically Offered: Fall term only

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 340 - Personal Training


    Provides a theoretical overview of the scientific and practical knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to be a competent personal trainer. Includes content necessary for nationally recognized certification exams administered by organizations such as the National Strength and Conditioning Association and the American College of Sports Medicine.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 345 - Sports Ethics


    Looks at issues in youth sport, intercollegiate sport, and professional sport. Discusses ethical questions, arguments, theories, and workable solutions for returning amateur sport to its proper place in society. Discusses the power of sport, the value of sport, and the place of sport in society.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 346 - Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity


    This course is devoted to understanding the psychological aspects of sport and physical activity. The course will include aspects of the core psychological research, application of psychological principles to sport and exercise settings, and social influences on psychological processes. Emphasis is placed on the comprehension and application of theoretical concepts addressing the interaction of individual characteristics and environmental factors in sport and physical activity.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 350 - Worksite Health Promotion


    Explores health promotion in the worksite including supporting theories and critical issues such as management support, economic benefits, and worksite health promotion professional standards; focus is on implementing worksite health promotion programs. Implementation phases include needs assessment/evaluation, effective interventions, program marketing and organizational development.

    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 355 - Ethics in Physical Activity and Health


    Explores ethical issues related to physical activity and allied health professions. Examines the practical application of principles and methods to evaluate ethical dilemmas in promotion of health. Topics include historical health-related & medical cases, development of current practices of informed consent, health policy and laws. The sub-fields of bioethics, sport ethics and contemporary issues in health will also be explored.

    University Requirement: GWAR Graduation Writing Assess
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
  
  •  

    KIN 360 - Nutritional Science


    Explores scientific concepts of nutrition related to nutrient chemistry, nutritional needs, practices, and problems throughout the life cycle. Examines where nutrition information is generated and how it is used in policy and populations. Emphasizes evidence-based, scientific nutritional information, education of individuals and groups toward health promotion and disease prevention. Finally, global nutrition issues are addressed with an emphasis on solutions.

    Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)
    Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

    Units: 3
 

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